Events & News in Sydney’s Asian Community

Sydney’s south western suburbs played host to thousands of animated festival goers for the September 3rd & 4th Moon Festival, a celebration of the 15th of the 8th lunar month also known as the Mid-Autumn Festival. Asian Culture is deeply embedded in traditional festivals. Just like Christmas and Thanksgiving in the West, the Moon Festival is one of the most important traditional events for the Chinese being an important event full of legendary stories and a popular occasion for large, family reunions for both Chinese and Vietnamese families.

An annual event determined by the equinox, when daylight and darkness are at an equal length, almost 80’000 festival goers attended browsing the food stalls, musical performances, live theatre including acrobatics & dance and of course the traditional Cantonese Lion Dance Parade, a must see spectacle! Fairfield City Mayor Mr. Frank Carbone praised the festival as providing such a valuable contribution to the surrounding local communities.

One of the few festivals even bigger in size and scale than the Moon Festival is the Chinese New Year Festival, a month long epic running from late January until early February. Hurstville Sydney will once again host a giant street show and parade with activities and fireworks galore encompassing the finest of Asian culture, traditions and arts with crowds milling until late in the night.

The other events are the traditional eye-dotting ceremony where the new lion dance costume is placed at the altar. This ceremony empowers the lion to do its duty of protecting the community, along with bringing them good luck, health and prosperity. The ceremony will be followed by group dances, singing events, lucky draw and the highlight of the evening, an interactive and traditional style costume parade.

As any Asian will tell you, no festival is complete without good food, and that is something which is found in abundance across the Hurstville location, stall upon stall of Asian delicacies and typical cooking demonstrations.

Asian festivals are full of colour and grandeur from plates of delicious foods to performances involving mythical creatures. Stories based on belief and legend have captured the imagination of writers for centuries and they’re now told with great joy on these festivals. Another important date is the Thai Water Lantern Festival which takes place across Parramatta, Sydney mid-November. Entry is free to witness the unveiling of ‘Loy Krathong’ a celebration of ushering in good luck and warding off evil by floating water lanterns in the river. The event will showcase intricate crafts from Thailand, traditional music, cultural performance by fire dancers, stunning fireworks displays as well as a water fountain display. Last but not the least, make sure you take part in the ritual act of launching the candle-lit Krathongs on the river as you make a wish for good fortune.

In fact, almost four percent of the Australian population is of Chinese heritage and Sydney is home to over half the Chinese population. The first generation of ethnic refugees and migrants came to Australia in the 1980s and have since prospered and integrated as students, employees, families, investors, business owners and heads of major corporations. Increasingly various Chinese social media platforms are showing high activity in the Sydney area. Chinese migrants take their culture with them when they travel and instill their history and values into their children who, in turn, enshrine these bonds as they adopt Australia and become valued members of society.

The main ethnic Chinese are from China, Hong Kong, Macau, East Timor, Malaysia, Vietnam, Taiwan, Indonesia, Singapore, Cambodia and Laos. The one great common denominator is that all of Sydney’s Asian community take great pride and real care in honouring long held tradition and beliefs with the finest event and festival celebrations they can produce with the time and resources at hand.

20 Cool Asian Restaurants in Adelaide

Great Asian food in Adelaide is happening all over the city. When the ACM Group team visited the South Australian capital famous for its eating houses and delicious dishes inspired by the orient we proved our reputation as the hungry visitors we are. Whether you are fond of sushi, noodles, curries, stir fries, fish cakes, Phos or BBQ duck the City of Churches has your tastes covered. Here are 20 cool Asian restaurants in Adelaide.

Shiki Japanese Restaurant

InterContinental Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8238 2382

Stylish hotel dining experience with teppanyaki, sushi and sashimi.

Kenji

5/242 Hutt Street, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8232 0944

Great seafood in the hands of a great chef. Try the puffer fish!

Star of Siam

67 Gouger Street, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8231 2527

Adelaide’s most consistently awarded Thai restaurant.

Jasmin

31 Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide, 5000.

A palace serving fantastic Asian food to celebs and plebs.

Adelaide Pho

199 Waymouth Street, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8212 0997

Great phos and a really busy place, which is always a good sign; a good range of Vietnamese food on the menu.

Gin Long Canteen

42 O’Connell Street, North Adelaide, 5006.

08 7120 2897

The perfect place for big parties of diners. Fast service and fantastic Thai food. Great cocktails at the bar and a really vibrant place.

House of Chow

82 Hutt Street, Adelaide 5000

08 8223 6181

Lots of well known Chinese dishes on a big menu and they are all pretty yummy. Big aquarium to choose your seafood from.

Concubine

132 Gouger Street, Adelaide, 5000

08 8212 8288

We all would like a concubine in our lives and this wonderful Chinese restaurant delivers in spades. Beautiful ambience and stunning food.

The Himalayan Kitchen

73 Melbourne Street, North Adelaide, 5006.

08 8267 3037

Superb Indian and Nepalese cuisine and a lovely space to dine in. Great vegetarian dishes on the menu as well.

Monsoon

141 O’Connell Street, Adelaide, 5000.

08 7225 5382

Seriously good Asian fusion food delivered in style to your table. Lovely service and brilliant dishes make this a fine restaurant experience.

Mandoo

26 Bank Street, Shop 3, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8231 3303

Korean food doesn’t get much better than this. A man do what a man has to and that is eat well.

Sit Lo

30 Bank Street, Adelaide, 5000.

0439 004 161

Yummy Vietnamese café in the heart of the city. Well priced and a buzzy intimate place.

Pondok Bali

310 Putteney Street, Adelaide, 5000.

08 8232 0588

Spicy Indonesian food perfect with a cold Bintang. Bali in the middle of the city.

Other notables:

Madame Hanoi Bar & Bistro; Mapo Korean; House of Pearl; Orient; Golden Boy; Ding Hao and Asian Central.

Night Noodle Markets in Review

Night noodle markets have emerged around the capital cities of Australia’s states, as part of various festivals and celebrations of cultural diversity and food. Twinkling fairy like lights in beautiful locations in Hyde Park in Sydney, the Festival Centre in Adelaide, and on the banks of the Yarra River in Melbourne, are enchanting a hungry audience of Australians and tourists. Yummy food in magical locations can inspire even the most jaded of palettes. The range of food offerings from the stalls at these night noodle markets is staggering and worth trying as many of them as possible.

Korean food is a big favourite in Sydney and Pok Lol do great Korean style tacos. The thing is that the restaurants involved have to adapt their traditional flavours to forms that suit the quick eating and casual seating of these events. Thus the Korean taco, which features the meats of your selection with a kimchi slaw; and it tastes divine. Bao Stop and Mr Bao feature pork belly crackling, XO fried chicken bao and Peking Duck fries. The Sydney night noodle markets also features some northern Chinese food at Mrs Ni: dumplings, shallot pancakes and Taiwanese- style fried chicken; absolutely delicious. Plus lots of noodle dishes, ramen noodles, knife-cut noodles, hokken and more. Robots cutting noodles at the Taste of Shanghai; very Bladerunnerish! The roti from Malaysian Mamak is so light and yummy with curry sauce.

More than half a million people visited the night noodle market in Melbourne with around sixty stalls feeding the thousands. Hoy Pinoy, Red Spice Road, Chin Chin and Gelato Messina were back again and the innovation knows no bounds. Wrapping food in food to avoid too many costly and polluting take way containers sees cultural traditions mutating in form but not at the expense of flavour. Great dumplings are a favourite of mine and delicious tacos and burgers attract the punters by the thousands. There are sweets and desserts as well with waffles on a stick, coconut sorbet, mango ganache, Nutella dipping sauce; just some of the flavours and forms you can indulge in.

The Adelaide night noodle markets were another great success, attracting many thousands of visitors to the centre of Adelaide on the Torrens River. Vibrant music rocked the concourse around the Festival Centre and Asian food in a myriad of designs and dishes took centre stage. The dumplings and noodles were great, as were the Thai quail and Korean BBQ. A beautiful spot to share some nibbles with family and friends; plus great wines and beers were available.

Do you provide food for the night noodle markets? Do you have a fantastic stall we should know more about? Contact the folks here at ACM Group so we can cover anything new and exciting you might be cooking up!

Inspirational Quotes



ACM Group Sydney

 

In order to develop a certain inner progress the artist’s thing is very much influential and helpful. I mean, helpful as well as harmful.. It depends on the meaning that the artist is conveying.. Now, you see, certain art is made to have an impact on hatred, or anger, such things.. and that is harmful.. In any way, the artists with their art, and with this ritual thing, have powerful means to give a message… – Dalai Lama

As you have been saying this I have been thinking that there are.. I have heard of, two ways of doing paintings.. One is that a person thinks beforehand in thought of what the painting will be.. and then paints it out.. And that would be like the thought approach.. But then there is another one, where the person does not think about it beforehand, but just spontaneously does whatever seems appropriate.. And that would be a thoughtless approach, even throwing paint onto the canvas and so forth, but a work of art coming out. – Dalai Lama
It seems that with the artist, first there is the inner feeling and the thought, and then there is the expression of this in an artistic way.. whereas for the audience there is first the reception of this expression and then a change in thought. – Dalai Lama

Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it. – Confucius

Art reaches its greatest peak when devoid of self-consciousness. Freedom discovers man the moment he loses concern over what impression he is making or about to make. ~Bruce Lee

It has been said that art is a tryst, for in the joy of it maker and beholder meet. ~ Kojiro Tomita